Monday, November 1, 2010

Persian Miniature

A Persian miniature is a small painting, whether a book illustration or a separate work of art intended to be kept in an album of such works. The techniques are broadly comparable to the Western and Byzantine traditions of miniatures in illuminated manuscripts. Although there is an equally well-established Persian tradition of wall-painting, the survival rate and state of preservation of miniatures is better, and miniatures are much the best-known form of Persian painting in the West. Miniature painting became a significant Persian form in the 13th century, and the highest point in the tradition was reached in the 15th and 16th centuries. The tradition continued, under some Western influence, after this, and has many modern exponents. The Persian miniature was the dominant influence on other Islamic miniature traditions, principally the Ottoman miniature in Turkey, and the Mughal miniature in the Indian sub-continent.


(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)


Though at various stages it has been affected by Chinese and Eastern influences, Persian miniature art has developed its own distinctive features. Whether it's being displayed in museums, casino hotels, or in private collections, Persian art has its own distinct features. For instance, Iran's miniature artists are recognizable for their emphasis on natural and realist motifs. Also worth noting is the Persian technique of "layering" perspectives to create a sense of space. For example, in the miniature piece at right, the variety of views is noticeable in the arrangement of objects: birds inhabit both the foreground and background of the piece, with the floral objects positioned in between. This gives the viewer a sense of threedimensional space and the ability to focus on certain aspects of the piece to the exclusion of others. Content and form are fundamental elements of Persian miniature painting, and miniature artists are renowned for their modest, subtle use of color.

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